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Alan Anstead Aug 15, 2016
One immediate outcome of the EU referendum result was a significant increase in incidents of hate crime, principally racist, xenophobic, Islamophobic and anti-Semitic hate incidents. The police state around 6,200 such incidents in England and Wales were reported to them in the month of July, over twice last year’s July figure. Even celebrities like the BBC’s Great British Bake Off winner Nadiya Hussain have said they have been subjected to racial abuse.
There has been much speculation over the cause of this spike in hate crime and hate speech. Was it closet racists who thought the referendum result legitimised their views and made it acceptable to tell those they considered ‘foreign’ to ‘go home’? Was it the result of the political campaigning around the referendum and the anti-migrant/anti-free movement of labour stance taken by the campaigning groups? Was it pent up frustration from years of austerity measures that erupted into some people blaming anyone who appeared to come from another country, a distinction based on skin colour, looks or language spoken? Probably a mixture of all these and more causes.
Don Flynn Aug 1, 2016
What else could Byron’s have done? The social media world was awash with attempted defences of the hamburger chain after it collaborated in the arrest of 35 of its migrant workers earlier in July. Our answer is they didn’t have to go along with the shabby act of entrapment of its staff, and they could have done so much more to push back against punitive, anti-worker rules.
                      The operation directed against migrant employees of the fast food chain, Byron Hamburgers by Home Office Border enforcement officials on the evening of 4th July has sparked a lively discussion about the extent to which employers should be held to any sort of standard why it comes to a duty of care towards its workers. 
Alan Ali Jul 16, 2016
Reports of racial abuse and attacks in the wake of the referendum result have spiked. The hostile atmosphere generated by the ‘debate’ about immigration during the campaign is damaging social cohesion. No wonder people feel scared and insecure.
      Eighty years after the Battle of Cable Street in which the East End Jewish community and anti-fascists stopped Moseley’s Blackshirts marching through a migrant community, there are reports of a rise in anti-migrant feeling, abuse and attacks following the narrow pro-Brexit vote on 23 June.  
Alan Anstead May 6, 2016
The insidious expansion of immigration enforcement activities into other areas of public life is becoming an increasing menace to the human and legal rights of many migrant communities. Operation Nexus is an example of what is going and we set out the reasons why its steady creep needs to be checked.
A lot has been said, for and against, free movement within the EU. Most people think it means that any EU national can travel to another EU country and live there, work there or look for work. That’s true for the first three months. But after that it becomes murkier. One has to ‘access one’s freedom of movement rights’ which means being in employment, being self-employed, being a student with finance for the duration of the course, or having funds to sustain oneself and family. Freedom of movement is one of the founding principles of the EU, designed to support the economies of EU countries by providing a mobile work force. However, did you know that the UK government is forcibly deporting hundreds of EU nationals, many of them illegally?
Don Flynn Feb 29, 2016
Even Brexit supporters seem to agree that the UK will still need immigration in or out the EU. So what options are there for replacing free movement?
There has been much talk in recent times about the potential for a ‘points-based scheme’ (PBS) being used to control immigration in the event that the UK votes to leave the EU in the June referendum. The supporters of this approach frequently cite the example of Australia as providing a model which would allow a ‘tougher’ attitude to be taken to admitting the migrants who the UK authorities believe are necessary for the UK economy.
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