Home Office

Gracie Bradley Jan 16, 2017
The campaign to oppose government efforts to collect nationality and place of birth information about school kids is gathering pace. Last weekend it held its first national conference. Gracie Bradley looks at the recent progress of the Against Borders for Children campaign, which she works on when she isn’t at MRN managing the Route To Your Rights project
              As I said at the opening of our conference at the weekend, it’s hard to believe that four months ago Against Borders for Children was little more than a Twitter message thread between a handful of willing volunteers, a draft of an open letter, and a 2-page campaign strategy.           
Don Flynn Dec 5, 2016
If the UK is supposed to be becoming a more hostile environment for migrants, the latest figures from the Home Office show there is stiff resistance to the trend. It is essential that this continues.
Last week’s immigration statistics, covering the year up to June 2016, show that the movement of people across frontiers continues to be much more responsive to economic factors than it is to the highly-politicised control agenda.         The headline figures are:
Don Flynn Nov 28, 2016
The ‘hostile environment’ took another step to consolidate itself in the public sector last week. Patronising and banal in many ways, it is nevertheless a threat to the rights of migrant workers involved in providing public services
The provisions of the Immigration Act 2016 are now rapidly rolling out, stripping many important rights from migrants and refugees as they do so. The English or Welsh language requirements for public sector workers came into force on 21 November.  A Code of Practice directed to public sector employers sets out what is expected from them. The workers who will need to meet these standards of language are all staff who work in customer-facing roles including permanent and fixed-term employees, apprentices, self-employed contractors, agency temps, police officers and service personnel.
Don Flynn Oct 10, 2016
The policy pronouncements at the Conservative conference show how far the government is prepared to go to turn migration into a rights-free zone. Both EU and the third country migrants will lose out under these plans. We need a campaign that unites them all if rights are to be preserved.
The immigration policies which Theresa May and her home secretary, Amber Rudd, revealed at the Conservative party conference last week seem to have got short shrift from just about everyone. 
Alan Anstead Aug 15, 2016
One immediate outcome of the EU referendum result was a significant increase in incidents of hate crime, principally racist, xenophobic, Islamophobic and anti-Semitic hate incidents. The police state around 6,200 such incidents in England and Wales were reported to them in the month of July, over twice last year’s July figure. Even celebrities like the BBC’s Great British Bake Off winner Nadiya Hussain have said they have been subjected to racial abuse.
There has been much speculation over the cause of this spike in hate crime and hate speech. Was it closet racists who thought the referendum result legitimised their views and made it acceptable to tell those they considered ‘foreign’ to ‘go home’? Was it the result of the political campaigning around the referendum and the anti-migrant/anti-free movement of labour stance taken by the campaigning groups? Was it pent up frustration from years of austerity measures that erupted into some people blaming anyone who appeared to come from another country, a distinction based on skin colour, looks or language spoken? Probably a mixture of all these and more causes.
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